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  • Partisan Universalism: Essays in Honour of Ato Sekyi-Otu

    This collection of essays celebrates the work of Ato Sekyi-Otu as a scholar, teacher and friend, marking his extraordinary contribution to the philosophy, politics and praxis of liberation. As Ato Sekyi-Otu has argued in his most recent book, Left Universalism, Africacentric Essays (Routlege 2019), universalism is an ‘inescapable presupposition of ethical judgment in general and critique in particular, especially indispensable for radical criticism of conditions of existence in postcolonial society and for vindicating visions of social regeneration’. Universalism must and can only be partisan. Edited by Gamal Abdel-Shehid and Sofia Noori, the collection includes essays by Stefan Kipfler, Patrick Taylor, Sophie Mcall, Gamal Abdel-Shehid, Jeremy M. Glick, Nigel C. Gibson, Jeff Noonan, Esteve Morera, Tyler Gasteiger, Olúfeṃ́i Táíẃò, Susan Dianne Brophy, Nergis Canefe, Chistoher Balcom, Lewis Gordon, and by Ato Sekyi-Otu himself.

    Responding to the invitation ‘to re-member severed but shareable things’, these lovers of truth, freedom, and dignity celebrate the searing intellect, generosity, wit, and compassion of the person and the scholar Ato Sekyi-Otu. … Combined with Sekyi-Otu’s autobiographical reflections of learning to be Black in the United States and insistence that Afropessimism turns the perverse ontology of the antiblack world into a Black ontology, this is a precious contribution. Not to be missed! —Jane Anna Gordon, author of Statelessness and Contemporary Enslavement and co-editor (with Drucilla Cornell) of Creolizing Rosa Luxemburg

    Ato Sekyi-Otu’s thought is one of the most important and exciting in Africa today. The texts compiled in this volume celebrate and engage with the work of Sekyi-Otu … They bear eloquent witness to Sekyi-Otu’s stature as a thinker and to his consistent commitment to the universalization of humanity in both theory and practice.  Deeply anchored in African cultures and modes of life, Sekyi-Otu has shown how ideas of human universality are ingrained in African popular sayings and proverbs and are regularly reflected in artistic creations. — Michael Neocosmos, Emeritus Professor in the Humanities, Rhodes University, South Africa


    CONTENTS

    Preface by Ato Seyki-Otu

    • Introduction

    • Fanon for a post-imperial world:
 On universals and other human matters – Stephan Kipfer
    • The Sea Menagerie:
 Esi Edugyan’s Atlantic – Patrick Taylor
    • Reconsidering Fanon’s
language of recognition
in Indigenous studies – Sophie McCall
    • On Fanon and Lacan:
 Continuities and structural psychiatry – Gamal Abdel-Shehid
    • Aimé Césaire’s
 Two ways to lose yourself:
 The Exception and the rule – Jeremy M Glick
    • Universality:
 Notes towards rethinking
the history of philosophy – Esteve Morera
    • Husserl and Tran Duc Thao:
 Crisis, renewal, and
the ontology of possibility – Tyler Gasteiger
    • Can Kwame Gyekye’s
 moderate communitarianism take
the individual seriously? – Olúfẹ́mi Táíwò
    • Speaking for, speaking through, speaking with – Jeff Noonan
    • ‘Innocuous Nihilism’, social reproduction
and the terms of partisanship – Susan Dianne Brophy
    • Universalism and immanent critique in
’The End of Progress and Left Universalism’ – Christpher Balcom

    Afterword by Lewis R Gordon

    • About the contributors