LENIN: The Heritage We (Don’t) Renounce

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These 100 tributes, from every continent, are like building blocks, in word and image creating not a mausoleum, but paths to a new future… It’s about thinking with and through Lenin, and the proof is here. — Isabelle Garo, author of Communism and Strategy.

The organic intellectuals in this book have woven a thread of what is to be done in the heart of fascism today, a tool for reclaiming our humanity. — Gacheke Gachihi, member of the Kenya Organic Intellectuals Network.

A left that rejects Lenin’s legacy in times of catastrophic capitalism and imperialist war can neither be truly left-wing nor have a decisive influence on world history. —Michael Brie, author of Rediscovering Lenin.


Lenin: The Heritage We (Don’t) Renounce brings together 100+ authors and visual artists from 50+ countries across the world – from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe – in order to critically commemorate the hundredth anniversary of the death of Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov, aka Lenin, on 21 January 1924.
Combining academic, journalistic and more personal-political texts, including poetry, theatrical skits and fictional writing, the books’ contributors aim to identify and constructively engage with the living legacy of Lenin’s life and work before, during and after the October Revolution. Concretely, the 100+ texts deal with a great variety of “old [Leninist] truths that are ever new” (Lenin), both historically and in today’s times: Imperialism, the National Question and the Right to Self-Determination, the Vanguard Party, Trans Liberation, Ecological Leninism, Dialectics, Artificial Intelligence, Military Marxisms, Black Liberation, Communist Feminism as well as Revolutionary Dreaming and Organising, among many others.

Also, Lenin is put into dialogue with a number of revolutionary comrades-in-arms, among them Amílcar Cabral, Mao Zedong, Julius Nyerere, José Carlos Mariátegui, Julio Antonio Mella, G.F.W. Hegel, Antonio Gramsci, Qu Quibai, Alexandra Kollontai and Rosa Luxemburg.

In sum, the book aspires to help liberate the old Ilyich from the musty, petrifying solitude of his mausoleum and to invite him back into the “real movement, which abolishes the state of things” (Marx & Engels) in the here and now, i.e. our multiple, intersecting struggles against all types of capitalist-colonial-heteropatriarchal-ableist oppression and for the rekindling and strengthening of the new Communist horizon.

While many on the contemporary Left continue to openly disavow any association with Tovarish Lenin, Lenin: The Heritage We (Don’t) Renounce affirms the opposite – that there will be no revolution without Vladimir Ilyich among our rank-and-file comrade-ancestors. Or in the words of one of the book’s authors, Himani Bannerji, “We neglect Lenin’s voice at our own peril.”

To work, everybody, to work,
the cause of the world socialist revolution
must and will triumph.
(Lenin)

ISBN Print: 9781998309047
Publication Date: January 2024
Page Count: 364
Binding Type: Paperback
Trim Size: 6in x 9in
Language: English
Colour: Colour

Clear

Hjalmar Jorge Joffre-Eichhorn is a German-Bolivian theatre maker, compulsive reader – printed books only – and reluctant writer. Since 2010, he has been feeling at ease in the post-Soviet space, particularly in Kyrgyzstan and Ukraine. After much ideological soul-searching, he…

    Preface: The Cult is Dead, Long Live the Cult!

    xi

    1

    Obituary for Lenin

    KYRGSOC

    1

    2

    Cabral and Lenin: An Ideological Conversation

    Abel Djassi Amado

    4

    3

    This too is Leninism: Military Marxisms in Africa

    Adam Mayer

    8

    4

    The Wreaths of Lenin

    Adrien Minard

    13

    5

    Me and the Lenin Museum

    Aimo Minkkinen

    16

    6

    Lenin and Mao

    Alain Badiou

    19

    7

    Invocation of Lenin

    alejandra ciriza

    23

    8

    Lenin, Dialectics, and Trans Liberation

    Alex Adamson

    26

    9

    Lenin and Artificial Intelligence

    Alex Taek-Gwang Lee

    29

    10

    My Lenin

    Alexander Vatlin

    32

    11

    Lenin, Liberated Woman of the East

    Anara Moldosheva

    34

    12

    To Blow (Up) The Mausoleum

    Anatoli Ulyanov

    37

    13

    Lenin, Labriola and the Historical Nodes of International

    Communism

    Andrea Bonfanti

    40

    14

    Moscow is Just Two Steps Away

    Andrés Carminati Ciriza

    43

    15

    Encountering Lenin in Iceland (and Once in Denmark)

    Árni Daníel Júlíusson

    45

    16

    A Letter to Lenin in Lagos

    Baba Aye

    48

    17

    ‘Baking Books’ – Practising Revolutionary Theory Through Bread

    Baran Caginli

    53

    18

    On the Day in Skopje When Anarchists for Lenin Became a Possibility …

    Ben Watson

    55

    19

    Pupils at the Same School, Enemies in 1917: Lenin and Kerensky

    Bill Bowring

    58

    20

    Lenin, the (un)making of a critical legal theorist

    Camila Vergara

    61

    21

    A Feminist-Socialist View of Lenin and the Soviet Revolution
    from the Río de la Plata
    María Cecilia Espasandín Cárdenas

    65

    22

    Holiday Haunts for Progressive Travellers. Lenin’s Guide to Europe

    Chris Read

    68

    23

    Lenin and Black Power

    Christian Høgsbjerg

    73

    24

    Lenin met Makhno (Or Did He?)

    Colin Darch

    76

    25

    Lenin: Building Hope

    Constantino Bértolo

    79

    26

    Lenin on Women’s Emancipation and Sexuality

    Daria Dyakonova

    82

    27

    Richter and Gus

    David McIlwraith

    85

    28

    Lenin, Psychoanalysis and Free Love

    David Pavón-Cuéllar

    88

    29

    Lenin’s Enduring Influence on the Struggle against Imperialism in Africa

    Demba Moussa Dembélé

    93

    30

    How the Soviet Union Saved the Caribbean without Colonisation

    Earl Bousquet

    96

    31

    Reclaiming Lenin in Iran: Challenging Male Dominance
    in the Revolutionary Movement
    Elsaa and La’al

    99

    32

    Snapshot of the Statues

    Esther Leslie

    101

    33

    “Vilici”: The Theoretician of Hegemony in Antonio Gramsci’s
    Prison Notebooks
    Fabio Frosini

    104

    34

    Lenin’s Vanguardist Party: Reflections on the Nigerian Revolution

    Femi Aborisade

    107

    35

    Back to Zimmerwald

    Franco ‘Bifo’ Berardi

    110

    36

    How I cooked soup with Lenin

    Frigga Haug

    113

    37

    Lenin’s Vision: Awakening of the Masses to Socialist Future

    Gal Kirn

    117

    38

    Lenin, Partisan of the Conjuncture

    Gavin Walker

    120

    39

    Lenin and the Weltgeist: A Philosophical Reflection

    George Sotiropoulos

    123

    40

    Consciously Revolutionary Workers Do Not Fall From Heaven

    Gianni Del Panta

    126

    41

    One of the Creators of the 20th Century

    Göran Therborn

    129

    42

    The Mass Psychology of the Renunciation of Lenin

    Gordana Jovanović

    131

    43

    A Century of Lenin in Tunisia (1924-2024)

    Habib Kazdaghli

    134

    44

    Lenin’s Battles

    Helena Sheehan

    139

    45

    Between the Poetry of Revolution and the Prose of State Formation: Lenin in Memoriam

    Himani Bannerji

    142

    46

    I Do Not Know

    Ian H. Birchall

    145

    47

    Lenin’s Dream

    Ian Parker

    148

    48

    Lenin and Nyerere – A Conversation in the Heavens

    Issa Shivji

    151

    49

    Dictator Lenin vs. Democrat Churchill?

    Jacques Pauwels

    156

    50

    V.I. Lenin and Black Liberation

    Joe Pateman

    159

    51

    Leninists

    John Holloway

    163

    52

    Dear Lenin

    J. Moufawad-Paul

    165

    53

    José Carlos Mariátegui and Lenin

    Juan E. De Castro

    168

    54

    Lenin Never Quoted Lenin

    Juan Dal Maso

    171

    55

    Sasha and Volodya in Sri Lanka

    Kanishka Goonewardena

    174

    56

    With friends like these…

    Kaveh Boveiri

    177

    57

    Lenin and the Living Dialectic

    Kevin B. Anderson

    180

    58

    Too soon! Too late? It’s Time!

    Lars T. Lih

    183

    59

    “All and Sundry”

    Leo Zeilig

    186

    60

    Lenin and the Long Journey to the East: The Case of Qu Qiubai

    Luka Golež

    190

    61

    Lenin’s Way Out

    Mahir Ali

    193

    62

    Lenin in Bakhmut

    Marc James Léger

    196

    63

    The Need to Dream and the Importance of (Re)Believing in Lenin

    Marcela Magalhães

    199

    64

    Lenin and the deep history of Inner Eurasia

    Marcus Bajema

    202

    65

    Ecological Leninism and Proletarian Agency

    Matt Huber

    206

    66

    Lenin Against Stalin: The National Question

    Michael Löwy

    209

    67

    Lenin and the Invention of Politics

    Michael Neocosmos

    212

    68

    President Putin is somewhat right

    Michał Kozłowski

    215

    69

    Hiding

    Minna Henriksson

    218

    70

    Thinking (in) the conjuncture

    Natalia Romé

    222

    71

    Eulogy of Lenine by a Cuban Marxist

    Natasha Gómez Velázquez

    225

    72

    Lenin Will Rise Again Like a Phoenix

    Naweed

    228

    73

    Lenin on the Moon

    Nicholas Bujalski

    231

    74

    Lenin and Great Russian Chauvinism

    Nigel C. Gibson

    235

    75

    The Star of Lenin Still Shines

    Olya Murphy

    239

    76

    Lenin on the Buses

    Owen Hatherley

    242

    77

    Lenin: Responding to Catastrophe, Forging Revolution

    Paul Le Blanc

    247

    78

    The Three Tragedies of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

    Peter Hudis

    250

    79

    Lenin in Thailand

    Puangchon Unchanam

    253

    80

    Six Links of Leninism

    Redrock

    256

    81

    Building Strength in the Weakest Link: Lenin and the Philippines’ Internationalist Solidarity

    Regletto Aldrich Imbong

    259

    82

    Against the Capitalist Scaremongers from 1917 to 2024, 2025, etc.

    Richard Gilman-Opalsky

    262

    83

    Lenin and Me

    Ronald Grigor Suny

    265

    84

    Whatever Would Lenin Have Said? – We Owe Him an Answer!

    Ronald Matthijssen

    268

    85

    Lenin on Women and Social Reproduction … in Vietnam

    Ly Hoang Minh Uyen (Sally Mju)

    273

    86

    Lenin on Imperialism: Wrong But Also Right

    Sam Gindin

    276

    87

    Lenin as Method

    Sandro Mezzadra

    280

    88

    ‘Lenin’ is the Name of a Man

    Sara Katona

    283

    89

    On the Eve of Revolution, When Ilyich Visits Rosa…

    Sevgi Doğan

    287

    90

    Publishing as Scaffolding                                                          

    Sezgin Boynik

    291

    91

    Words: 26 October 1917

    Sheila Delany

    294

    92

    Lenin at His Worst… Or at His Best?

    Slavoj Žižek

    295

    93

    What to Do With Chto Delat?

    Soma Marik

    297

    94

    The Finest Statue of Lenin Ever Made

    Stefan Gužvica

    303

    95

    Lenin’s “Left-Wing” Communism and ISO-Zimbabwe in the late 1990s working-class struggles

    Antonater Tafadzwa Choto

    306

    96

    Lenin’s Legacy – An Alternative to Capitalism

    Tamás Krausz

    309

    97

    Lenin, Theorist of the Integration of the National, Colonial
    and Social Questions
    Thierno Diop

    312

    98

    The Vanguard Question

    Will Cameron

    315

    99

    What Lenin Did Not Say

    Wladislaw Hedeler

    318

    100

    Lenin’s Death in China

    Xianxin Yuan

    320

    101

    Eleven Theses on the Contemporaneity of Tovarish Lenin

    Yağmur Ali Coşkun

    323

    102

    Lenin of February 24th

    Yevgeniy Fiks

    327

    103

    “Truth [is] Not in ‘Systems’”: Our Politics of the Event

    Yutaka Nagahara

    328

    104

    Lenin’s Time

    Jodi Dean

    333

    About KickAss Books

    336

    About Daraja Press

    337

    Bibliography

    338

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    Customer Reviews

    1-5 of 3 reviews

    • Vesa Oittinen

      On the 100th anniversary of his death, Lenin seems to have fallen in oblivion — and however, when one takes a look at the present situation of the world, his ideas are more needed and more actual than ever. Almost nothing about what he wrote — on politics, on philosophy, on imperialism, on the right of the nations to self-determination — has become obsolete. On the contrary, many questions have become, if possible, more acute than during his lifetime. This book gives an excellent cross-section of what Lenin thought and wrote, and explains his actuality. — Vesa Oittinen, Professor emeritus, Aleksanteri Institute, University of Helsinki, Finland

      January 31, 2024
    • Ray Bush

      The editors of this collection on Lenin and his lasting influence, have collated a simply wonderful and critically engaged celebration of the 20th century’s most significant political actor. It’s difficult to summarise the 104 contributions that include poems, love letters, imaginary dreams, fiction and ‘dialogue’ with Lenin as well as theoretical treaties and political manifestos. The collection provides insight and dynamic interpretations of the range of many of Lenin’s contributions to political struggles that shaped revolutionary transformations for generations and continues to do so. Ray Bush in ROAPE

      February 6, 2024
    • Ian Parker

      The book, edited by Hjalmar Jorge Joffre-Eichorn and Patrick Anderson, has an unsettling title “Lenin: The Heritage We (Don’t) Renounce,” which basically boils down to an affirmation of Lenin against all those who would want to denounce him, whether that is outright reactionaries who have never actually read him to former revolutionaries who now conveniently disown him. Over a hundred authors from (nearly) every corner of the world pit themselves against mis-readings and misunderstandings of Lenin in short essays, most of which are bite-sized and some of which are more difficult to digest. … This is an unashamedly partisan book, on the side of the exploited and oppressed and showing that Lenin, for all his faults, was too. The editors tell us that “The shamelessly immodest purpose of this book is to be an active part of this process of communisting; in our case, an unapologetically Leninist one”. It is a brave project, time-consuming, and now it takes time to read it – this is a big book – but worth it if we are to take Lenin to heart and liberate ourselves. — Ian Parker, Two, three, many Lenins https://anticapitalistresistance.org/two-three-many-lenins/

      February 14, 2024

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